Posts Tagged ‘youtube’

Jane Ostrander: Scenario-based Learning and Social Media

Monday, November 30th, 2009

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First off, we hope you and your family had a happy and safe Thanksgiving!

A couple weeks back, we talked to Gordon Snyder about using social media in the classroom. This week we’re hearing another perspective from Jane Ostrander, Director of the Experimental Learning Center at De Anza College in Cupertino, Calif.

Jane is writing her dissertation about the reasons why people choose to participate in online knowledge sharing. It boils down to a cost/benefit analysis: “The potential participant must see some value in participating that outweighs whatever costs s/he anticipates will occur as a result of that participation.”

Once an online community is established, it’s vital to make sure participants have a stake in the conversation. Jane cites research showing that “a sense of either personal ownership or stewardship of the information enhanced sharing.”

Jane and her team are putting these insights to work in an online community on the educational site Tapped In. They’re using the site to explore new ways to disseminate instructional materials and lesson plans, and to develop online “wizards” to provide advice to community college instructors. Jane has also used YouTube as a way to get materials out to a wide audience without spending a lot of money – “always a concern with budget-impaired community college faculty,” she notes.

As for other social media sites like Facebook and Twitter, Ostrander thinks it’s important not to confuse tools with learning. She hopes that her fellow teachers remember the lesson from the advent of the personal computer. “Buying and networking a bunch of computers and parking them in the back of the classroom did not automatically enhance teaching and learning in that classroom,” she notes.

“Social network tools provide educators with a means to connect with and inform students, but that’s not the same thing as facilitating learning,” she says. “The interaction between teacher, student, content and environment – including the available tools – is what makes learning happen in the classroom.”

In other words, it’s not the technology but what teachers are able to do with it that makes a difference for students. That’s why she’s staying actively involved in her Tapped In community. “Essentially, our project team is driving the bus at this point, though hopefully not forever, whereas social media tools just deliver the bus and a set of keys and say, ‘Go for it; make of it what you will.’”

Welcome to ATETV!
We Look Forward to Connecting with You!

Thursday, September 17th, 2009

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Hello everyone! We’d like to extend a big welcome to you and thank you for coming to our newly launched ATETV Web site! We have built an online community in order to communicate directly with students, educators, guidance counselors, and parents about Advanced Technological Education. We work in conjunction with the nationwide ATE Centers, and we are here to help enlighten and educate people about the amazing opportunities available for those interested in technical careers. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics has estimated that between 2004 and 2014, U.S. companies will hire 2.5 million new workers in jobs involving science, technology, engineering and math. So we are happy to report that there are tremendous opportunities and demand for students with technical degrees!

Every Monday ATETV will debut a new episode showcasing Advanced Technological Education in the classroom and the field. Our goal is to provide video content focused on real-world careers and skills for those who study in technical fields. We have traveled across the country to film ATE success stories from coast to coast. With an emphasis on centers and community colleges, our program focuses on the education of technicians for the high-technology fields that drive our nation’s economy.

In addition to our weekly videos, ATETV aims to create an online network for ATE students, educators and professionals. We encourage you to contact us on ATETV.org by commenting on this blog or posting on our Forum. You can also follow us on social media Web sites; comment on our videos on YouTube and check us out on Twitter and Facebook.

Please drop us a note if you have any questions or comments; we look forward to interacting with you!