Posts Tagged ‘ATETV’

Inside Industry: Reality TV for Tomorrow’s Technicians

Monday, July 25th, 2011

If you want to train students in the technologies of the future, who better to turn to than the industries that will employ these future technicians?

One of the hallmarks of the Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program has always been the close collaboration ATE has established between community colleges and industry to produce the up-to-date curriculum necessary to produce a job-ready workforce.

That’s why we’re excited to tell you about a new series of ATETV programs coming up this fall. Called “Inside Industry,” the segments will take viewers behind the scenes of some of the country’s leading industries, including manufacturing, welding, and information technologies.

These in-depth “job descriptions” will go beyond employer interviews to provide a real-life look at work environments, equipment, skills and people — presented from the perspective of recently hired technicians and their supervisors. You’ll see inside an advanced-tech manufacturing plant. You’ll watch a welder work with laser precision. You’ll hear firsthand from some of the country’s biggest leaders in the IT field.

Stay tuned –through “Inside Industry,” prospective students and educators alike will get a glimpse of the work life of today’s technicians and will hear straight talk from their employers about the opportunities and challenges that are part of today’s rapidly changing workplaces.

Talk about reality TV!

Coming up SOON on ATETV!

Friday, April 1st, 2011

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A Sneak Preview

Last year’s White House Summit launched an important discussion of the many key roles that community colleges play in workforce development and in student success, particularly in the technology fields.

Now, this year, the conversation continues, with the U.S. Department of Education holding a series of four regional community college summits at cities around the country, which will culminate in a Community College Virtual Symposium the week of April 25th.

With that in mind, we thought we’d take this opportunity to join in on the conversation with a “sneak preview” of some of the subjects that ATETV will be covering in upcoming episodes later this spring. The 40 new programs will blend solid “how-to” information and classroom profiles with visits to some of the nation’s most prominent technology companies to help students get the most out of the community-college experience and provide employers and educators with important resources.

For example, the “101 Series” will provide viewers with a crash-course in the community college experience. Beginning with in-depth examinations of course curriculum and academic requirements in a variety of community college programs, and ending with up-close examinations of the career paths that these programs can lead to, these ATETV segments will include first-person interviews with employed technicians to learn how they landed their positions.

A second focus of upcoming ATETV programs will be the four-part “From High School to College” series created to help students explore higher-education opportunities while they are still in high school, and provide them with an important head-start to their future career paths. Specific subjects will focus on dual-enrollment programs, and the value of informational interviews.

Other segments will take viewers behind-the-scenes of leading technology employers, offer students career-building “tech tips,” and visit community-college classrooms around the country, providing students with “previews” of course content – before they enroll.

Stay tuned, there’s a lot more to talk about!

ATE Central – A Wealth of Information

Friday, October 1st, 2010

This week, ATETV adviser Nouna Bakhiet from Southwestern College in San Diego, described an ATE Program that’s helping to launch students into the Biotechnology field — which is booming in Southern California as well as many other areas of the country. Here’s what she says:

San Diego is a national hub for Biotechnology. Southwestern College started a Biotechnology technician training program in 1999 to serve the minority population of the San Diego South Bay. The program attracted participants seeking jobs as well as transfer students. The students complete a set of rigorous lecture and lab courses to prepare for real-life research internships.

In 2004, the ATE-sponsored BETSI (Biotechnology Education and Training Sequence Investment Project) was launched to bring cutting-edge Biotechnology practices to Sweetwater Union High School District and to train Southwestern College student in the fundamentals of Biotechnology. The BETSI model helps get pre-college students excited about the field and helps position community college students for successful careers as Biotechnology technicians and STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) majors. From high school to community college to the workplace, BETSI is an education and training cascade bringing students from books to the benches of research.

Believe it or not, BETSI is just one of 349 ATE projects and centers at community colleges around the country. Covering a wide swath of subjects and specialties alphabetically ranging from A(AgrowKnowledge: The National Center for Agriscience & Technology Education) to W (Water and Wastewater Technician Training Institute at Bowling Green Community College), the ATE programs are designed to support and inspire educators, students and the general public as they explore the depth and breadth of the Advanced Technological Education Program.

You can find descriptions and links to all of these programs, encompassing nearly 3,000 courses, modules, and activities on ATE Central the ATE’s online portal and one-stop shopping resource. ATE Central’s digital library can help direct users to ATE’s full range of easy-to-use online resources, which include curricula, learning objects and podcasts. The portal also serves as a central communication and support point for all of the many individuals involved in ATE centers and projects and through the site’s collaborative tools and reference materials, enable educators to implement successful projects and mentor new projects.

Take a look, but leave yourself plenty of time — from Nanotechnology to Viticulture and Enology Science (wine making) to Terrorist Agent Control Technology and everything in between, there’s a wealth of information and ideas about Advanced Technological Education programs to keep you engrossed for a very long time!

Coming Up Next on ATETV…

Friday, September 10th, 2010

It’s hard to believe how fast time passes, but it’s been one year since the launch of ATETV!

Since then viewers have “met” a wide spectrum of individuals who described the numerous programs and opportunities available through the Advanced Technological Education programs at community colleges around the country. Along the way we became acquainted with leaders in such emerging fields as Alternative Energy, Biotechnology and Cybertechnology; were introduced to students who were following their dreams studying exciting programs in simulation and video game development and exploring “high-flying” careers in Wind Energy as well as Aviation Technology; and talked with ATE leaders from around the country who told us about the many up-and-coming career opportunities available at community colleges nationwide.

Now, ATETV producers are back at work on 40 new videos. Once again, they’ll be going behind the scenes to visit classrooms, industries and other settings to bring viewers a firsthand look at the many ways that community college programs are leading to good-paying jobs and rewarding futures — and at the same time, filling the many critically important new technology positions that will prove key to our country’s economy, our environment and our future.

For a quick glimpse of one of these new videos, this week we’re sharing video footage shot last month by an ATETV production team at Three Rivers Community College in Norwich, Connecticut. As you’ll see in the clip — and learn more about in an upcoming ATETV video — the college’s Project TLC (Technology Learning Community) provides incoming college freshmen with an accelerated summer preparation program in math and English, along with college readiness skills. The program’s dynamic “learning community” not only provides students with important group settings in which to grow and develop, but also brings in industry speakers to share their experiences and even takes students on industry tours for a firsthand look at today’s real-world employment.

And there’s much more to come! Stay tuned for 40 new ATETV videos to learn about the innovative new educational programs and promising career opportunities that await students at community colleges around the country — it’s shaping up to be another exciting year!

ATETV and the Telly Awards

Saturday, June 26th, 2010

Behind the Scenes of the Award-Winning ATETV!

Today, we go behind the scenes of ATETV to talk with the series Creator and Executive Producer Anthony Manupelli. Besides learning more about how the ATETV series was developed and what makes it tick, we had an ulterior motive — to congratulate Anthony and the production team on this week’s announcement that the Web series has won three Telly Awards!

The annual Telly Awards were founded in 1978 to honor outstanding local, regional and cable TV commercials and programs, as well as video and productions and online film and video. The competition received more than 13,000 entries (from all 50 states and five continents) for this year’s competition. ATETV received Bronze Tellys in three categories: Education Film/Video Production; Education Internet/Online Programs; and Education Internet/Online Video.

We caught up with Anthony at Pellet Productions, a production company outside Boston, and though he was happy to talk with us about ATETV, he was too modest to brag about the Telly Awards. So we decided to do the bragging for him!

Congratulations on these terrific awards, I understand that the mission of the awards is to “strengthen the visual arts community by inspiring, promoting, and supporting creativity” and that judges are the creative professionals who have previously won Tellys themselves and are peers within the industry.

Thanks. Yes, it’s an honor to be recognized by our peers and an honor to be recognized for such a worthwhile project.

Tell us a little bit about how ATETV originated.

Several years ago while at WGBH-TV (Boston’s PBS affiliate) I was producing a series called Pathways to Technology which profiled students and showcased some of the technological programs at community colleges across the country. This was a real eye-opener for me. I’d had no idea of the incredible resources and the sophisticated technologies that community colleges had to offer. I didn’t realize that the community colleges routinely partnered with industry, and I was especially impressed with the teachers’ dedication.

But it seemed like more people needed to know that these amazing programs existed. Even though the federal government’s Advanced Educational Technology (ATE) initiative was launched more than 20 years ago, some of the participating students didn’t even realize they were in ATE programs! So, in designing ATETV, our goal was to make the invisible visible, and show prospective students what community colleges really looked like and to demonstrate that community colleges were a viable educational option. We also wanted to profile the workplaces so they could see that working in a plant didn’t mean being on a boring assembly line — we wanted to show how dynamic the work environments were, and we wanted people to be able to see the amazing robotics and other sophisticated technologies that are in today’s technological workplaces.

How did you decide on the program’s format?

From continuous research, the Association for Interactive Media Education (AIME) and Pellet Productions,Inc. knew that our primary audience -– prospective students and others in the community college world -– get much of their information through the Internet. So whether they’re on a computer, or on a cell phone, an I-phone or now an I-Pad, they’re looking for dynamic, visually appealing information that’s easy to digest in a short period of time and points them to additional resources if they want. This format also enables the colleges to download the content from the Web so that they can use it on their own websites.

What about content, how did you decide what subject areas to focus on?

We did a lot of testing, conducted focus groups and worked closely with our advisory board to design stories that would be representative of the diverse student populations, the numerous technological programs and the many career opportunities that ATE programs offer. As a result, we highlighted some great subjects – Laser Technology, Wind Farms, Women in Aviation, Video Game Design, Biotechnology Internships, Environmental Technology – to name a few. Among other things, we learned that Green Technologies were really taking off, so a lot of our emphasis has been on these up-and-coming “green” careers.

What do you think makes ATETV unique?

First, it is story. We have searched the country and found people who have very real, compelling stories to tell. We also have very strong visuals to support their stories. From underwater ROVs to wind turbines, the field footage imagery we captured for this series is amazing. These videos show firsthand the incredible work coming out of the 2 year colleges.

Another aspect of ATETV we think is particularly important is collaboration: We share the videos not only with the people who we’ve videotaped, but with other people in the ATE community so they can share their input with us and assist with fact-checking to make sure that everything in our scripts is accurate. Then we work with our advisers and with the sites and then go back and tweak the content based on their input — nothing is done in a vacuum. We’re especially careful about all of our content because these are essentially living resumes that we’re documenting.

Another really cool, yet geeky, aspect of the series is that we maxed out on the latest technologies to produce a 48 episode video series within budget. From cameras to software, we used every tool available in producing this series.

What feedback have you received so far on the programs?

It’s been really positive, people seem really happy. When
we first began the project it was hard to get the colleges and individuals to sign on to participate — everyone was so busy, they didn’t feel they could devote the time to the project. But now that they’ve seen the videos, word has been spreading and lots of people now want to be a part of the project. We’re really pleased with the response.

ATETV Episode 23: One Degree, Multiple Possibilities

Monday, February 22nd, 2010

This week, we explore some of the many different paths you can take with a degree in Information and Communications Technologies and learn more about the applications of Precision Agriculture.

First, we delve deeper into the fields of Information and Communications Technologies. “I think students are naturally drawn to careers in IT and ICT. They are immersed in it. Telecommunications, networking, security, wireless…. they live, eat and breathe this stuff, “says Mike Qaissaunee of Brookdale Community College, “and they assume they know everything about it, just because they do it every day.” But once these same students are in a class, the picture changes and it becomes more about the mechanics of how things work. With this new information and the hands-on experiences provided at local community colleges, students interested in Information and Communications Technologies graduate with many different options available to them.

The same is true for those students graduating from programs in Agriculture Technology. As farmers work to make their industries more productive and efficient, those with a background and experience in Precision Agriculture become more and more in demand. Precision Agriculture is the application of mapping technologies like GPS/GIS systems to better understand in-field variability. This allows farmers to adjust for localized differences relative to specific areas and crops. Students studying this can expect to find opportunites working with seed dealers, seed companies, farmers, cooperatives, chemical companies and many more.

One thing is certain, with a degree in advanced technology comes plenty of job security and many possible career choices! The only challenge maybe deciding on one! Thanks for watching.

Student Update: From Community College to a Four-year Degree

Tuesday, December 15th, 2009

In this week’s first segment, we meet Shain Eighmey, a graduate of the biotechnology program at Great Bay Community College (GBCC) in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Shain is a great example of how a community college degree can give students a head start to a four-year degree; he’s currently finishing up his bachelor’s in microbiology at the University of New Hampshire.
“What I learned in the two-year program at Great Bay Community College really gave me a great head start at UNH,” Shain told us when we checked in for an update this week. “My credits all transferred, and I found that I had a much better understanding of biology and biochemistry than many of the other students I was taking classes with at UNH.”
Shain thinks GBCC’s hands-on approach has given him a leg up on his fellow UNH students. “I spent a great deal of my time at GBCC in the labs, working with real lab equipment using real lab techniques, and that’s an advantage that has really done great things for me,” he said.
His community college education has also helped Shain in the classroom, as he learned in his virology class his very first day at UNH: “The professor asked the class to describe the difference between transcription and translation, and the first few students who answered the question were incorrect! I was very surprised, as this was something that we had gone over in great detail in the Biotechnology classes at GBCC.”
Shain’s the rare student who knew in high school what he wanted to do for a career, but he says he’s been guided by some simple advice that he received from his grandparents. “Do what interests you,” he advises other students. “Studying, working, and paying attention in a lecture is much easier when the subject matter is something you have a passion for.”
Shain is planning on graduating from UNH this spring. He’s in the process of applying for master’s programs and other opportunities. Whatever comes next, his time at GBCC and his own work ethic have put him in a great position to succeed.

In this week’s first segment, we meet Shain Eighmey, a graduate of the biotechnology program at Great Bay Community College (GBCC) in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Shain is a great example of how community colleges can help propel students towards a four-year degree; he’s currently finishing up his bachelor’s in microbiology at the University of New Hampshire (UNH).

“What I learned in the two-year program at Great Bay Community College really gave me a great head start at UNH,” Shain told us when we checked in for an update this week. “My credits all transferred, and I found that I had a much better understanding of biology and biochemistry than many of the other students I was taking classes with at UNH.”

Shain thinks GBCC’s hands-on approach has given him a leg up on his fellow UNH students. “I spent a great deal of my time at GBCC in the labs, working with real lab equipment using real lab techniques, and that’s an advantage that has really done great things for me,” he said.

His community college education has also helped Shain in the classroom, as he learned in his virology class his very first day at UNH: “The professor asked the class to describe the difference between transcription and translation, and the first few students who answered the question were incorrect! I was very surprised, as this was something that we had gone over in great detail in the biotechnology classes at GBCC.”

Shain’s the rare student who knew in high school what he wanted to do for a career, but he says he’s been guided by some simple advice that he received from his grandparents: “Do what interests you. Studying, working, and paying attention in a lecture is much easier when the subject matter is something you have a passion for.”

Shain plans to graduate from UNH this spring. He’s in the process of applying for master’s programs and other opportunities. Whatever comes next, his time at GBCC and his own work ethic have put him in a great position to succeed.

ATETV Episode 13: Technology in the Lab and on the Farm

Monday, December 14th, 2009

This week we’re exploring how ATE programs are preparing students for work not only in traditional high-tech settings like medical laboratories and electronics shops, but also out in the fields of American agriculture.
First, we meet Shain Eighmey, a graduate of the biotechnology program at Great Bay Community College in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Shain has turned his childhood passion for science into a two-year degree, a paid apprenticeship at a pharmaceutical company, and now a four-year degree at the University of New Hampshire. You can read an update about him here. [LINK]
Next we head to Kirkwood Community College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where Kelsey Meyerhoff is working towards her own two-year degree in agricultural technology. Among other things, she’s learning to use GPS technology to track soil samples in the field, a skill she first learned in a workshop while still in high school. Her classes are predominantly male, but Kelsey says that doesn’t bother her. “It’s just a challenge you push through, and you don’t look at it as something that holds you back,” she says.
Finally this week, we meet a dedicated educator who is sharing what he learned during his long career. Richard LeBlanc is the head of the electronics department at Benjamin Franklin Technical Institute in Boston, where he teaches students to repair electronic equipment, including many of the advanced medical devices used in hospitals today. A graduate of the institute himself, LeBlanc knows the value of ATE programs firsthand. He also knows, from his industry contacts, that teaching students how to communicate effectively is just as important as teaching the technicaThis week we’re exploring how ATE programs are preparing students for work not only in traditional high-tech settings like medical laboratories and electronics shops, but also out in the fields of American agriculture.

First, we meet Shain Eighmey, a graduate of the biotechnology program at Great Bay Community College in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Shain has turned his childhood passion for science into a two-year degree, a paid apprenticeship at a pharmaceutical company, and now a four-year degree at the University of New Hampshire.

Next we head to Kirkwood Community College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where Kelsey Meyerhoff is working towards her own two-year degree in agricultural technology. Among other things, she’s learning to use GPS technology to track soil samples in the field, a skill she first learned in a workshop while still in high school. Her classes are predominantly male, but Kelsey says that doesn’t bother her. “It’s just a challenge you push through, and you don’t look at it as something that holds you back,” she says.

Finally this week, we meet a dedicated educator who is sharing what he learned during his long career. Richard LeBlanc is the head of the electronics department at Benjamin Franklin Technical Institute in Boston, where he teaches students to repair electronic equipment, including many of the advanced medical devices used in hospitals today. A graduate of the institute himself, LeBlanc knows the value of ATE programs firsthand. He also knows, from his industry contacts, that teaching students how to communicate effectively is just as important as teaching the technical skills.

ATETV Episode 11: Learning at Any Age

Tuesday, December 1st, 2009

This week we meet students with three different circumstances: a recent community college grad out in the workforce, a returning professional changing careers, and current students who got a jump start on their ATE classes during high school.

First we meet Travis Blackwell, who’s putting his ATE degree to use as a field service engineer for ESAB, an international Swedish industrial company with welding and cutting equipment manufacturing facilities located throughout the world. Travis earned a 2-year degree in electromechanical engineering technology at Florence-Darlington Technical College.

As part of his studies, Travis completed an internship, where he worked with the same equipment that he now maintains in the field. “College essentially taught me how to think for a higher level, problem solving and to do any sort of analysis whatsoever,” he says. “The hands-on training did help a lot with establishing good fundamentals for the lectures.”

Next we meet Susan Clark, who has gone back to school to pursue a certificate in biotechnology. After the job that had kept her busy for 12 years ended, Susan decided to act on her love of science and study for a new career, and she says she’s not alone in doing so. “There were several people in my class who were just about my age. One was retired looking for something else to do. Another one, he was switching jobs, due to layoffs.” Susan’s biotech studies will prepare her for a new high-tech career, possibly in environmental quality monitoring.

Finally we return to Florence-Darlington Technical College, where several of the current students actually started earning college credits while still in high school. “We need to begin to develop the technical expertise and the technical skills in a much younger child, so that they have the chance to help us create a global competitive environment,” says Jill Heiden of ESAB — the same company that now employs Travis Blackwell. By starting early, students are setting themselves up for successful careers like Travis’.

Jane Ostrander: Scenario-based Learning and Social Media

Monday, November 30th, 2009

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First off, we hope you and your family had a happy and safe Thanksgiving!

A couple weeks back, we talked to Gordon Snyder about using social media in the classroom. This week we’re hearing another perspective from Jane Ostrander, Director of the Experimental Learning Center at De Anza College in Cupertino, Calif.

Jane is writing her dissertation about the reasons why people choose to participate in online knowledge sharing. It boils down to a cost/benefit analysis: “The potential participant must see some value in participating that outweighs whatever costs s/he anticipates will occur as a result of that participation.”

Once an online community is established, it’s vital to make sure participants have a stake in the conversation. Jane cites research showing that “a sense of either personal ownership or stewardship of the information enhanced sharing.”

Jane and her team are putting these insights to work in an online community on the educational site Tapped In. They’re using the site to explore new ways to disseminate instructional materials and lesson plans, and to develop online “wizards” to provide advice to community college instructors. Jane has also used YouTube as a way to get materials out to a wide audience without spending a lot of money – “always a concern with budget-impaired community college faculty,” she notes.

As for other social media sites like Facebook and Twitter, Ostrander thinks it’s important not to confuse tools with learning. She hopes that her fellow teachers remember the lesson from the advent of the personal computer. “Buying and networking a bunch of computers and parking them in the back of the classroom did not automatically enhance teaching and learning in that classroom,” she notes.

“Social network tools provide educators with a means to connect with and inform students, but that’s not the same thing as facilitating learning,” she says. “The interaction between teacher, student, content and environment – including the available tools – is what makes learning happen in the classroom.”

In other words, it’s not the technology but what teachers are able to do with it that makes a difference for students. That’s why she’s staying actively involved in her Tapped In community. “Essentially, our project team is driving the bus at this point, though hopefully not forever, whereas social media tools just deliver the bus and a set of keys and say, ‘Go for it; make of it what you will.’”